New Semester, New Arrivals S2015

Hello, 2015!

To kick off our spankin’ new semester we’ve got a deluge of new arrivals, scores and CDs! To save this poor blogger some time, we’ll be posting half of them today and some more tomorrow (arbitrarily chosen). Here’s day 1, and check back tomorrow for some more!


Baker – Mickey Baker’s Complete Course in Jazz Guitar, books 1-2 – MT582 .B2 1955

Baker – Mickey Baker’s Jazz Guitar – MT582 .B2 1973

Glenn & Taylor (ed.) – Classic Italian Songs for School and Studio, Vol. III – M1619 .G536 C5 v. 3

Lu – Partita for brass trio – 357.4 .L8 P37 2013

Meacham – American Patrol; German Trombone Vibration, arr. for trombone quartet by Jorg Vollerthun – M459 .M43 A44 2011

Mozart – Concerto no. 14 in E-flat major for Piano and Orchestra (KV 449) – M1011 .M93 K.449 1990

Mozart – Concerto no. 27 in B-flat major for Piano and Orchestra (KV 595) – M1011 .M92 K.595 2011

Mozart – Piano Concerto in G Major piano reduction (KV 453) – M1011 .M93 K.453 2006

Mozart – Piano Concerto in C Major piano reduction (KV 467) – M1011 .M93 K.467 2006

Phillips – Catamaran for brass septet – M757.4 .P45 C38 2013

Saint-Saens – Concerto no. 1 in A for Violoncello and Orchestra, op. 33 – M1016 .S15 op. 33 2001

Segovia – Diatonic Major and Minor Scales – MT585 .S44 D53 2011

Sousa – The Gladiator March, arr. for trombone quartet by Andrew Converse – M459 .S68 G53 2010

Sousa – Stars and Stripes Forever, arr. for trombone by Brad Howland – M459 .S68 .S83 1999

Tiger Rag, arr. for trombone quartet by Jack Gale – M459 .T541 1993

Von Suppe – Light Cavalry (the good parts), arr. for trombone quartet by Craig Kaucher – M459 S88 2006

Wagner – Ride of the Valkyries, arr. for trombone by David Uber – M459 .W25 R46 2002



Allen Anderson – An Opportunity for Mischief – CD 6962

David Claman, Ryan Vigil, John McDonald – Keypunch – CD 7089

Trouble Funk – Drop The Bomb – CD 1892

Love’s Labour’s Lost (Original Cast Recording) – CD 8289

A Loving Home’s A Happy Home: 19th Century Moravian Parlor Music – CD 8279

Otha Turner and the Afrosippi Allstars feat. the Rising Star Fife and Drum Band – From Senegal to Senatobia – CD 2204

Yann Tiersen – Music from the Motion Picture Amelie – CD 2080



Symphony Season: the Numbers!

The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra just compiled a very interesting batch of data based on the 2014-2015 season programming of 21 major national orchestras. The BSO (and by the BSO, probably some of their interns, but who knows?) aggregated the nation’s planned performances into the below infographic, which contains some very interesting (but, possibly, unsurprising) information about the performed material- age of pieces, gender/nationality of composers, popularity of certain composers, etc.

Enough out of me, peruse this fascinating (and very visually appealing) infographic (more writing beneath it)!

Orchestra Season Infographic

Like I said, this is a very interesting chart, but I’m not sure how surprising its revelations were. That said, it is quite staggering to see the actual numbers, such as 98% of all performed composers being male, and that the most performed living composer only gets 35 performances while the most performed composer overall gets 317. The nationality divide between most-performed composers overall vs. living is intriguing as well. All of these facts bring with them a litany of implications about the diversity (or lack thereof) in classical music performances, especially if you’re a fan of the genre, or if you want to become a professional classical musician.

My favorite thing about this infographic is the fact that the BSO actually put it together. I think it’s great that a major orchestra like the BSO is beginning to take strides to reassess the standards of what they and their peers perform. According to the original article, they will be publishing several pieces in the coming weeks analyzing their finds further, which is sure to be even more interesting.

In other news, a very happy birthday to Neil Young!

AU Musical Events: Unfinished Business 4/25-26

Unfinished business… The term itself causes my OCD tendencies to go haywire. There is a sort of bravery, a glorious abandon, in leaving business unfinished. And while most of the working world shudders at the admission that business will go unfinished, it happens quite often. Except for this post, which I will finish before my shift ends.

Anyways, and unsurprisingly, there are a great many pieces in the musical repertoire that remain unfinished. With the classical composers, constantly creating at a feverish rate, it’s understandable that some things would get left behind. Two of the most prolific of the great composers, Mozart and Schubert, were not immune to the curse of the unfinished, and this weekend our AU Symphony and Chorus will delve into two of the greatest unfinished works (an oxymoron?) in the classical repertoire.

Conducted by DPA professors Yaniv Dinur and Dan Abraham, the Symphony and Chorus will first tackle Mozart’s Great Mass in C Minor, an epic and ambitious mass that proved to be too much so for the composer, who left it unfinished when he died. The second is possibly the most famous unfinished piece of all, Schubert’s Symphony No. 8, known as the “Unfinished Symphony.” Interestingly, after composing the first two movements, he simply never returned to it in the six years of his life that followed its composition.

Both pieces are revered, and are quite impressive even in their incomplete state. More impressive still are the implications: what was written was too great to be done up by any greater final movement. They gave it their all at the get-go. Come see the AUSO&C perform these pieces, as completely as possible, on Friday or Saturday night at 8 in Katzen. The event costs $15 to attend, but if you’re an AU community member you can get in for $10.

Event page: