Beyoncé & Soundtracks

New CDs have arrived. If you’re taking the Beyoncé class next semester or the Epic Film Scores class, come have a listen!

Beyoncé B’day Deluxe Edition CD 2792

Beyoncé Dangerously In Love CD 2793

Destiny’s Child Destiny Fulfilled CD 2798

Destiny’s Child Survivor CD 2797

Vertigo the Original Motion Picture Soundtrack CD 2801

Lawrence of Arabia the World Premiere Recording of the Complete Score CD 2799

Advertisements

New CDs: Florence, Django, and Sara Bareilles

Welcome back to school everyone! Over the summer we have weeded out our CD collection, which means there is now space in the stacks for new and exciting CDs!

We have many new CDs rolling in, but here are three we thought you wouldn’t want to miss.

 

 

Is Meryl Streep as good(??) as the real Florence?

Florence Foster Jenkins: The Complete Recordings CD 2731

Have you seen Meryl Streep’s new movie “Florence Foster Jenkins yet? If you’re wondering what the real Florence Foster Jenkins sounds like, we just got a CD version of her only recordings in at the Music library! If you haven’t seen the movie, here’s a quick recap: Florence Foster Jenkins was a socialite and self-proclaimed coloratura soprano in New York, who enjoyed giving frequent private concerts for her friends, and enjoyed a robust singing career, singing for a sold out Carnegie Hall, and at the Ritz-Carlton. Cole Porter wrote a song for her, and Lily Pons and Sir Thomas Beecham were fans of hers. She founded the “Verdi Club” with the aim of promoting the Grand Opera and benefiting artists and musicians. What made Florence so unique? She couldn’t sing.

This CD contains the 9 pieces which Florence and her long-time accompanist Cosme McMoon, recorded in New York between 1941 and 1944. These recordings were paid for by Florence, and originally only distributed to friends.The CD version of the recordings was released a few months before the release of the film.

 

See for yourself how Florence sings with admirable enthusiasm and confidence, while missing the mark in regards to rhythm and intonation. (Staff favorite is Adele’s Laughing song from Die Fledermaus)

The movie “Florence Foster Jenkins” is still in theaters in D.C., and the Music Library now has a documentary feature about Florence which will be on the shelf next week!

 

Life.Liberty.Vengeance

Quentin Tarantino’s Django CD 2730

Remember the incredible soundtrack to the film Django Unchained? We now have it available for check out, along with many other great film soundtracks which arrived over the summer! (Check those out here) Quentin Tarantino is not only the director of this film but also the Executive Music Producer, giving the movie and its music an incredible synthesis. Several original songs were written by Tarantino for the film, and the soundtrack also includes songs featuring John Legend, Rick Ross, Jamie Foxx, James Brown and 2PAC, and Ennio Morricone.

 

 

I love you like a table

Sara Bareilles’ Waitress CD 2729

Sara Bareilles has written a Broadway musical, called Waitress, and it’s a whopping success! (4 Tony Nominations!) Based on the 2007 indie film with the same title, it tells the story of Jenna Hunterson, a waitress in a small town who is unexpectedly pregnant. She fears she will have to give up her dream of opening her own pie shop until she hears about a pie making contest. Whether you’re a Sara Bareilles fan or not, this musical is worth a listen, with songs that feel like a mix of pop, musical theater with a twang of country.

 

 

Fun Fact: Waitress made history as the first musical in Broadway history in which the top creative slots (writer, composer, director, choreographer) are filled by four women.

The Value of Music: Pitchfork weighs in

If you’ve kept up with our blog (I mean why wouldn’t you) you’d know we have a bit of a passing interest in the state of the music industry. With new music streaming platforms revealed every few months or so and the constant specter of declining music sales, the value of music is a mystery, and an ongoing online conversation exists trying to figure out what it really is.

Longtime Pitchfork contributor Marc Hogan has added his voice with an opus of a feature entitled “How Much Is Music Really Worth?“. This piece is essentially a giant economical analysis of the value of music, focused mostly on the shifting value of physical music sales. It includes several interesting infographics such as the one below, analyzing this shift in value.

In addition to his deep analysis of music itself, Hogan also covers topics such as live revenue and music publishing. He does a good job of examining all the facets of music-related income.

However, all of his explication seems to lead him to the inevitable truth that it has become more and more difficult to make a living as a musician. Hogan describes his experience with seeing the band Single Mothers on a tour that wasn’t making them any money, noting that most live revenue goes to a top 1% of performers.

Hogan attempts to end the piece on a positive note, noting that while some may think that music is worthless, worthless is just another word for priceless. He sets the value of music as transcending dollars and cents, which to him is what makes it worth the most. While I agree that music is worth more to me than most things, this seems like a sort of cop out… if the sole value of music is that people enjoy it, how will anybody afford to make it in the future? This is the sort of thing we’ll have to watch play out, I believe.

 

New CD Arrivals!

Little did you know that once again we at the music library are sitting on a big ol’ pile of new CD arrivals! These are all hip hop CDs, and will be on reserve for a college writing seminar that focuses on the language of hip hop. Sounds pretty cool…

And the arrivals are:

Queen Latifah – Black Reign – CD 10382

Monie Love – In A Word Or 2 – CD 10383

Fu-Schnickens’ – F.U. “Don’t Take It Personal” – CD 10384

Jungle Brothers – Done By The Forces Of Nature – CD 10385

Common – Resurrection – CD 10386

Queen Latifah – Queen Latifah and the Original Flavor Unit – CD 10387

Chi-Ali – The Fabulous Chi-Ali – CD 10388

Black Sheep – Non-Fiction – CD 10389

Queen Latifah – Nature Of A Sista’ – CD 10390

Fu-Schnickens’ – Nervous Breakdown – CD 10391

Jungle Brothers – Raw Deluxe – CD 10392

Jungle Brothers – J. Beez Wit The Remedy – CD 10393

Monie Love – Down To Earth – CD 10398

Happy Saint Patrick’s Day!

Yes, good folk, today is the day of Saint Patrick, that saint who converted the Irish to Christianity and banished all the snakes from the Emerald Isle, all while wearing some stylish green robes.

We at the music library may not all be Irish lads and lasses but we sure do like to celebrate this most viridescent of holidays! We have plenty of streaming audio (thanks to our many electronic libraries) that can provide the perfect soundtrack to your St. Patty’s merriment.

Yes, our electronic resources offer plenty, featuring many sides of Irish music. For beginners, there’s the Rough Guide to Irish Music, which is exactly what it sounds like: an introduction to the traditional sounds of the Isle. If Irish folk is your thing, we have Adieu to Old Ireland by the House Devils streaming, as well as a collection of Irish sailing songs called Ships Ahoy! and an album of folk songs performed on Irish harps called Harps d’Irlande.

If these folk songs have gotten you into the mood for this joyous day, you’re either taken up with the holiday as official Church feast day, the death date of Ireland’s patron saint, or you’re trying to party! Fear not, for we have appropriate streams for either position.

For the religiously-inclined, we have a great compilation of Irish sacred music called Irlande musique sacree. If you’re looking to have a roaring good time, look no further than this comp of the 20 best Irish pub songs, and top it off with this collection of olde irish jigs and reels.

Well, what are you doing still reading this? Go out and have yourself a time for St. Patrick, and bring your AU credentials with you so you can stream these awesome compilations!

The Inspiring Composer Behind the “House of Cards” Theme

We’ve covered a few NPR All Things Considered music interviews in the past: eco-experimental classical composer John Luther Adams and indie rock producer du jour John Congleton (coincidentally both named John). Last week ATC featured another crucial musician, one Jeff Beal, composer of the eerie-yet-sophisticated House of Cards theme.

Beal, who has also composed music for shows such as Monk, The Newsroom, and Carnivale, as well as the heartbreaking SeaWorld documentary Blackfish, describes the “musical joke” of the main theme. The bass line plays an ostinato in A minor for the duration of the theme, but the melody often slips into A Major, causing fleeting dissonances that set the tone well for the sinister TV series.

One cool fact about Beal is that he has taken the writing, arranging, and even recording process entirely into his own hands. He has no assistance with the writing and arranging of his scores, and records a 17-piece string ensemble in his living room. He also plays the trumpet, piano and guitar parts, and his talented musical family helps out as well: his wife Joan has recorded vocals for the score and their son Henry contributed the main bass line, recording from his dorm room.

Composer Jeff Beal (center) conducts string musicians in his California home.

Another awesome revelation is that Beal has managed to take such a hands-on role, despite his diagnosis with multiple sclerosis. While this crippling nervous disease began to show symptoms eight years ago, Beal’s combination of “alternative treatments” and strongly focused brain activity (via his feverish composing and recording) have managed to reverse brain atrophy and keep the disease at bay.

Jeff Beal is truly inspiring, as well as one of the coolest composers in the game (David Fincher hired him for House of Cards before even shooting it), and you should all check out this feature.

So proud of our Grammy winning CD, St. Vincent!

So guess what, readers? We have, on our shelves, a Grammy winning album (in CD form). No, not the Beck album; we’re staying out of that debate. No, we’re talking about the best Alternative Music Album, aka St. Vincent’s self-titled fourth full length, and it is a BEAST.

This album is a well-deserved winner, the clear best choice of 2015’s nominations, and an example of an artist in her prime, and continuing to evolve. 2012’s Strange Mercy, her previous album, was the perfect crystallization of sounds she had been developing on her first two releases. St. Vincent is the logical next step, seeing her pursue a darker, funkier sound and a new, cult-leader alter ego (seen below on the album cover):

However, in her excitement at becoming a Grammy-winning artist, the artist formerly known as Annie Clark stepped out of her persona to write a sweet thank you note to all of her fans. It describes, briefly, her musical journey from the outset of becoming “St. Vincent” to the present day. Read it here: http://ilovestvincent.com/#news

She also held a brief interview with Pitchfork and a longer one with i-D immediately after her win, revealing her excited mood in the wake of such a triumph. While the Grammys often seem out-of-touch and archaic, this award shows that they still possess a shred of “with it.” We’ll see what they pick next year. Meanwhile, celebrate with St. Vincent by checking out her album and seeing what’s so special about it yourself!